Here | Now | Look | See: Exhibition

An exhibition of the work took place from May 9th to May 15th, 2014 at The Penny Building Gallery in Lethbridge, Alberta. The intention of the exhibition was to provide an opportunity for people in the area to have access to the climate data that indicates change in ‘their backyard.’

Dr. Stefan Kienzle (second from left) in conversation with exhibition vistors

Dr. Stefan Kienzle (second from left) in conversation with exhibition vistors

The touch screen display for Climate Change in Alberta?

The touch screen display for Climate Change in Alberta?

This piece cycles through over 5 million data points that were incorporated in to the Climate Change in Alberta visualization. After 8 days of a new number every 1/2 second, it had only got through 1.6 million. The purpose of this work was to give the audience a sense of the scope of the data set being visualized.

This piece cycles through over 5 million data points that were incorporated in to the Climate Change in Alberta visualization. After 8 days of a new number every 1/2 second, it had only got through 1.6 million.

The purpose of this work was to give the audience a sense of the scope of the data set being visualized.

Stevenson screens at climate stations across Alberta are where the temperature recordings featured in this project come from. The enclosure is designed to shield thermometers from precipitation and direct sunlight, while still allowing air to circulate around them. This Stevenson screen is at least 20 years old and was donated by Joe Mickelson from the Agricultural Research Centre, Lethbridge.

Stevenson screens at climate stations across Alberta are where the temperature recordings featured in this project come from. The enclosure is designed to shield thermometers from precipitation and direct sunlight, while still allowing air to circulate around them.

This Stevenson screen is at least 20 years old and was donated by Joe Mickelson from the Agricultural Research Centre, Lethbridge.